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Bill Prince: Psychiatrist, Film Producer

Bill Prince: Psychiatrist, Film Producer

 

 

 





Introduction to Bill Prince.  2:31 min.  Interview: Raymond Elman.  Editing & Production: Sabrina Rubinstein.  Music: Daniel Estrada. Recorded via Zoom. 11/03/2020. 2:31 min.

 

BILL PRINCE, film producer, is a retired psychiatrist who has spent his career in public health, was not a draft resister, and had no experience with film prior to The Boys Who Said NO! He was born and raised in the Atlanta, Georgia, area, graduated from Yale University and Emory University School of Medicine, and lived in Seattle, Washington, for almost thirty years. He was recruited for the film by Producer Christopher Jones and has served as Jack-of-all-trades until Christopher’s untimely death in June 2019. He then served as Producer until its completion in June 2020. He feels that democracy is not a status but rather a struggle, and that citizen action is more likely than the voting booth to bring the change that people need.

The videos below were recorded via Zoom, are organized by Success Factor, and run between 38 seconds and 3:51 minutes. Click on any video. You must be connected to the Internet to view the videos.

 

 

BREAKS THE RULES: 3:50 min.





Tell us about Christopher Jones political activities.

 

DEVELOP A VOICE: 1:04 min.





It sounds like Christopher Jones was an extraordinary person, who was focused, mature and a risk-taker at a very young age.

 

COMMUNITY VALUES: 1:04 min.





What was your reaction to the action-oriented maturity of the students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School following the mass shooting incident?

 

CRITICAL THINKING: 1:21 min.





Where did you grow up and what was your first awareness of politics?

 

COLLABORATION: 2:00 min.





Talk about the Vietnam War draft resisters reunion that Christopher Jones organized.

 

COLLABORATION: 0:55 sec.





How did Academy Award-nominated film director Judith Ehrlich get involved?

 

CREATES A UNIQUE PERSONAL BRAND: 0:53 sec.





Judith Ehrlich did a masterful job of blending archival footage with contemporary talking heads. The film really flows well.

 

CRITICAL THINKING: 1:40 min.





What are your thoughts about the 2020 movie “The Trial of the Chicago 7”?

 

BREAKS THE RULES: 1:32 min.





Did the draft resistance movement have a pecking order? Were people who burned their draft cards and risked going to jail treated with more respect than conscientious objectors who moved to Canada?

 

SERENDIPITY: 1:42 min.





Were you ever in danger of being drafted?

 

PERSEVERANCE FURTHERS: 3:11 min.





What was your role on the film?

 

CRITICAL THINKING: 1:23 min.





Do you think Dr. Martin Luther King spoke against the Vietnam War to bring attention back to the Civil Rights Movement?

 

OVERCOMES CHALLENGES TO SUCCEED: 1:10 min.





Other than money, what were some of the biggest obstacles to getting the film made?

 

INSIGHT & INSPIRATION: 2:26 min.





Judith Ehrlich has made three films about war resistance. The first film is titled “The Good War and Those Who Refuse to Fight It.” Is that a good film?

 

EMPATHY: 0:37 sec.





Did the conscientious objectors from World War II ever receive recognition for their courage?

 

SERENDIPITY: 1:15 min.





How did you meet Christopher Jones?

 

CREATES A UNIQUE PERSONAL BRAND: 2:19 min.





Was Christopher in the film?

 

EMPATHY: 1:51 min.





This may sound like a dumb question, but does the draft still exist?

 

CRITICAL THINKING: 0:41 sec.





I always assumed that President Nixon ended the draft because college boys being shipped to Vietnam was fuel to the protest movement. But by time they ended the draft, it was too late to stop the anti-Vietnam War movement