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Kimberly Green: President of the Green Family Foundation

Kimberly Green:  President of the Green Family Foundation

 

 





Introduction to Kimberly Green.   1:19 min.  Interview:  Raymond Elman.  Post-Production:  Lee Skye.  Music: Goymamba.  Recorded via Zoom:  8/29/2021, Miami Beach.

 

A philanthropist, writer and documentary-filmmaker, KIMBERLY GREEN has led the Green Family Foundation (GFF) since 1997. Under her leadership, GFF has spearheaded a variety of initiatives in Haiti and in her native Miami.

In Haiti, where GFF has been active for more than a decade, Ms. Green’s work ranges from community health and development to cultural repatriation and preservation, and includes a partnership with Columbia University’s Earth Institute and the establishment of the Haiti Policy Program, as well as partnering with Fastforward for the Sinema Anba Zetwal (Cinema Under the Stars) “Food for Souls” tour (which followed the 2010 earthquake’s fault line and was attended by over 250,000), and executive producing The Alan Lomax in Haiti: Recordings for the Library of Congress, 1936-1937 box set (which received two Grammy nominations).

Ms. Green, who directed and produced the award-winning documentary “Once There Was a Country: Revisiting Haiti” (narrated by Dr. Maya Angelou and Guy Johnson), also oversees the Cultural Committee for the Clinton Global Initiative Haiti Action Network.

In her native Miami, Ms. Green and GFF fund a number of initiatives, among them the Little Haiti-based Youth Expressions and “A Photographic History of Black Miami” — a permanent exhibit curated by 34-year veteran Florida International University (FIU) professor Dr. Marvin Dunn and located in Camillus House’s Brownsville Christian Housing Center.

Furthermore, Ms. Green and GFF’s close association with FIU has resulted in the creation of both the Steven and Dorothea Green Library and the Digital Library of the Caribbean, as well as the establishment of NeighborhoodHELP (Health, Education, Learning, Program), where students of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine work with medically under-served families throughout Miami-Dade County.

Green got her start in public service as an intern under Senator Tom Daschle (D-SD), who inspired her to get involved with Head Start programs at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, and Senator John Breaux (D-LA), for whom she worked on Capitol Hill. Since then, Green has served on the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities Coming Up Taller program (under President Clinton), and the Boards of both the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center (FIAC) and the American Red Cross of Greater Miami and the Keys. Green created and was board President of E-Equality learning center, the first interactive computer learning center in Miami-Dade County (sponsored by Intel), lectured on HIV/AIDS education and prevention and civil society at Princeton and George Washington University, established the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine’s Pediatric AIDS program, and was primary funder of Project Medishare’s Community Health program.

Green, a member of the Alexis D. Tocqueville Million Dollar Round Table of the United Way, also received the American Red Cross Spectrum Ambassador Award, the Outstanding Philanthropist of the Year from the Association of Fundraising Professionals (2003) and the prestigious Navigation Award for her efforts in the cross-continental car rally, the Gumball 3000.

— www.greenff.org/

 

The videos below were recorded via Zoom, are organized by Success Factor, and run between 30 seconds and 6 minutes. Click on any video. You must be connected to the Internet to view the videos.

 

 

EXPOSURE TO BROAD INFLUENCES:   1:20 min.





Where did you grow up and what was your first exposure to art of any discipline?

 

VALUES FIRST-RATE EDUCATION:   2:41 min.





Did you spend all of your pre-college years in Miami?

 

COMMUNITY VALUES:  1:29 min.





Inspicio Arts published a video interview with author Nicholas Griffin. Have you read his book “Year of Dangerous Days”? It’s about Miami in the year 1980.

 

EXPOSURE TO BROAD INFLUENCES:  3:22 min.





Before the explosive growth of the Miami art communities in the 1990s and beyond, what were the opportunities to experience art?

 

EMPATHY:  5:43 min.





You wear a lot of hats. How did you evolve from a student at a boarding school in the UK to the leader of a multi-interest foundation.

 

COMMUNITY VALUES:  1:03 min.





Tells us about your support for South Florida prisoner education.

 

COLLABORATION:   2:59 min.





I am guessing that you can cross-pollinate successful concepts from one culture to another. For example, an initiative that works with indigenous people in the Southwest, might also work with people in Haiti.

 

COLLABORATION:  5:51 min.





Silos are diminished in the Provincetown art colony where most of the people in the arts attend most of the visual artists events, literary events, theatre, music, and film. It’s one whole art colony.

 

COMMUNITY VALUES:  2:32 min.





Regarding Green Space Miami, are you working with MiMO Historic District developer Avra Jain, whose video interview is on the Inspicio Arts website?

 

UNDERSTANDS ARTISTS’ NEEDS:  1:44 min.





Talk about the Green Family Foundation support for events and initiatives on a year-round basis.

 

COMMUNITY VALUES:  2:55 min.





A while back, the cover story for “National Geographic” was the topic of climate change and sea level rise. The cover photo was the view from my balcony in Sunny Isles Beach. They declared that Miami was the most endangered city in the USA.

 

COLLABORATION:  1:16 min.





In 2019, the Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami (MOCA) had an exhibition titled “PÒTOPRENS: The Urban Artists of Port-au-Prince,” which featured artwork made from the rubble of the gigantic earthquake in Haiti.

 

DEVELOP A VOICE:  2:14 min.





How long have you and your family been involved with Florida International University (FIU)?

 

CRITICAL THINKING:  4:22 min.





Haiti has suffered blow after blow after blow. What is the hope for Haiti?

 

INSIGHT & INSPIRATION:  3:23 min.





A few years ago, Inspicio Arts published an interview with a woman, a museum director, who brought up the subject of the “Imposter Syndrome,” a term that I had never heard before.

 

COMMUNITY VALUES:  1:32 min.





Most of your GFF initiatives are very serious. Which initiative was the most fun?

 

INSIGHT & INSPIRATION:  2:16 min.





What’s your favorite movie?

 

EXPOSURE TO BROAD INFLUENCES:  1:02 min.





The iconic film director Jonathan Demme (“Silence of the Lambs”) collects Haitian art — right?

 

COLLABORATION:  1:21 min.





Are you still involved with making films?